Independent Scots more likely to go solo

1st March 2017

By Andrea Wong

The poll revealed that almost one in three (31 per cent) people renting in Scotland live alone, compared to the national average of 21 per cent.

The company puts the finding down to cheaper rents, and therefore a greater chance of affording to have your own place, above the border. The same survey found that Scots pay £462 a month for rent on average – second only to Wales in affordability – with the national average being over £100 more at £583.

Samantha Jones, marketing manager at Knight Knox, said: “It’s certainly interesting to see such a large difference between Scotland and the rest of the UK in terms of cohabitation.

“The correlation between more affordable rents and increased likelihood of living alone shouldn’t be overlooked. Given the choice, many people would probably opt for their own space, and it seems that this is more of a possibility in Scotland, compared to more expensive areas like London and the South East, where only 18 per cent of renters live alone.”

When it comes to gender, more men live alone than women, with just 18 per cent of females doing so, compared to 28 per cent of men.

Meanwhile, renters in Northern Ireland are least likely to live alone, with just 12 per cent of renters there going solo and a third living with their partner and children – more than any other region.

Overall, renters in the UK are most likely to live with just their partner or spouse, with close to a third of those surveyed living as a couple.

Samantha added: “Our survey would suggest that renting is most suited to couples, perhaps as they prefer to wait until they own a property to settle down and have children. However, the survey does show a varied split between different living arrangements, which demonstrates the versatility of renting and its suitability for a cross section of people up and down the country.”

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Independent Scots more likely to go solo

01 March 2017

The poll revealed that almost one in three (31 per cent) people renting in Scotland live alone, compared to the national average of 21 per cent.

The company puts the finding down to cheaper rents, and therefore a greater chance of affording to have your own place, above the border. The same survey found that Scots pay £462 a month for rent on average – second only to Wales in affordability – with the national average being over £100 more at £583.

Samantha Jones, marketing manager at Knight Knox, said: “It’s certainly interesting to see such a large difference between Scotland and the rest of the UK in terms of cohabitation.

“The correlation between more affordable rents and increased likelihood of living alone shouldn’t be overlooked. Given the choice, many people would probably opt for their own space, and it seems that this is more of a possibility in Scotland, compared to more expensive areas like London and the South East, where only 18 per cent of renters live alone.”

When it comes to gender, more men live alone than women, with just 18 per cent of females doing so, compared to 28 per cent of men.

Meanwhile, renters in Northern Ireland are least likely to live alone, with just 12 per cent of renters there going solo and a third living with their partner and children – more than any other region.

Overall, renters in the UK are most likely to live with just their partner or spouse, with close to a third of those surveyed living as a couple.

Samantha added: “Our survey would suggest that renting is most suited to couples, perhaps as they prefer to wait until they own a property to settle down and have children. However, the survey does show a varied split between different living arrangements, which demonstrates the versatility of renting and its suitability for a cross section of people up and down the country.”

Andrea Wong

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