The vaccines have arrived

10th December 2020

By Will Leyland

The year is now approaching its end, the nights have drawn in, the temperature has dropped and we’re slowly emerging from a second lockdown but under far stricter measures than the previous tier system.

People are still getting used to this new normal, and whilst the year has progressed and the entire country has done what it needed to do to support us all through a tough time, if we’re all honest, we needed some good news to give us a boost.

Of course, news in the past few weeks of very encouraging vaccine trial results was a very welcome injection of hope (pun intended), so perhaps it’s now time to agree that there is genuine light at the end of an awfully long and dark tunnel.

Approval gained

The fantastic and welcome news arrived last week that the Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA) provided approval for the use of the Pfizer vaccine in the UK, with the government reportedly expecting the AstraZeneca/Oxford vaccine to follow it any day now.

There are significant differences between the two vaccines, with the Pfizer vaccine reporting a 94% effectiveness, whilst the Oxford vaccine reports efficiency of between 62% and 90% depending on the dose delivered. The two vaccines use different technologies to stimulate the immune system.

With the Pfizer vaccine needing to be stored at extremely cold temperatures and the government having ordered less, it’s more difficult to distribute amongst those needing it most, whilst the Oxford vaccine can be stored at fridge temperatures and has millions of doses ready to go whenever they’re needed.

The expectation is that the Pfizer vaccine will be delivered to those most at risk whilst the Oxford vaccine will be used to immunise the majority of the rest of the population. Children under 18 will not be vaccinated as they’re unlikely to suffer severe symptoms or death.

Post-Covid Economy

For those of us in property, it’s been by no means a bad year in terms of cold hard figures. Growth is huge, demand is high and yields have grown too.

What are the implications for the wider economy once a vaccine has returned us to normal? After all, a growing economy should, by logic, boost property even further.

In his assessment for the BBC, economics editor Faisal Islam said “We have never had a vaccine arrive in the middle of a pandemic before, so the benefits could be extremely large. It could be the equivalent of the East Asian countries’ which, through effective public health measures (rather than a vaccine), dodged the long-term fiscal and economic impact of SARS in 2003, and Covid-19 over the past year.

In other words it could, in economic terms, make up for the relatively sluggish response at the beginning of the pandemic.”

If this were to be the case, and there’s little reason to doubt it will be, then this could mean an absolutely monster year for property, landlords and buy to let.

After such a successful 2020, it may now be the time to gear up for more of the same next year.

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The vaccines have arrived

10 December 2020

The year is now approaching its end, the nights have drawn in, the temperature has dropped and we’re slowly emerging from a second lockdown but under far stricter measures than the previous tier system.

People are still getting used to this new normal, and whilst the year has progressed and the entire country has done what it needed to do to support us all through a tough time, if we’re all honest, we needed some good news to give us a boost.

Of course, news in the past few weeks of very encouraging vaccine trial results was a very welcome injection of hope (pun intended), so perhaps it’s now time to agree that there is genuine light at the end of an awfully long and dark tunnel.

Approval gained

The fantastic and welcome news arrived last week that the Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA) provided approval for the use of the Pfizer vaccine in the UK, with the government reportedly expecting the AstraZeneca/Oxford vaccine to follow it any day now.

There are significant differences between the two vaccines, with the Pfizer vaccine reporting a 94% effectiveness, whilst the Oxford vaccine reports efficiency of between 62% and 90% depending on the dose delivered. The two vaccines use different technologies to stimulate the immune system.

With the Pfizer vaccine needing to be stored at extremely cold temperatures and the government having ordered less, it’s more difficult to distribute amongst those needing it most, whilst the Oxford vaccine can be stored at fridge temperatures and has millions of doses ready to go whenever they’re needed.

The expectation is that the Pfizer vaccine will be delivered to those most at risk whilst the Oxford vaccine will be used to immunise the majority of the rest of the population. Children under 18 will not be vaccinated as they’re unlikely to suffer severe symptoms or death.

Post-Covid Economy

For those of us in property, it’s been by no means a bad year in terms of cold hard figures. Growth is huge, demand is high and yields have grown too.

What are the implications for the wider economy once a vaccine has returned us to normal? After all, a growing economy should, by logic, boost property even further.

In his assessment for the BBC, economics editor Faisal Islam said “We have never had a vaccine arrive in the middle of a pandemic before, so the benefits could be extremely large. It could be the equivalent of the East Asian countries’ which, through effective public health measures (rather than a vaccine), dodged the long-term fiscal and economic impact of SARS in 2003, and Covid-19 over the past year.

In other words it could, in economic terms, make up for the relatively sluggish response at the beginning of the pandemic.”

If this were to be the case, and there’s little reason to doubt it will be, then this could mean an absolutely monster year for property, landlords and buy to let.

After such a successful 2020, it may now be the time to gear up for more of the same next year.

Will Leyland

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